ANZAC Day 2019

The traditional Anzac ideals of courage endurance and mateship are still relevant today, established on 25 April 1915 when the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The inner west had a total of 14,522 WW1 enlistments. There are some cases where multiple members of one family have enlisted in different battalions.

Studio portrait of 164 Private John (Jack) Booth, A Company, 20th Battalion.

John Booth was a shipwright of Balmain, NSW, he enlisted in March 1915 and embarked on HMAT Berrima in June of that year. He was killed in action on 9 October 1917 at Passchendaele.

The Booth Brothers

Studio portrait of 9481 Driver (Dvr) Samuel Hordern Booth, 1st Divisional Train (left), his brother 164 Private (Pte) John Booth, 20th Battalion (seated) and an unidentified soldier. Dvr Samuel Booth, a carpenter from Balmain, NSW prior to enlistment, embarked with the 14th Reinforcements from Sydney on HMAT Ballarat on 16 February 1916. Later transferring to No 28 Company, Army Service Corps, he returned to Australia on 23 June 1919. Pte John Booth, a shipwright and also from Balmain, NSW prior to enlistment, embarked with A Company from Sydney on HMAT Berrima on 25 June 1915. Following service at Gallipoli, he transferred to the 5th Machine Gun Company in France. Later returning to the 20th Battalion, he was posted as missing in action in Belgium. It was subsequently determined that he had been killed in action at Passchendaele on 9 October 1917. Having no known grave he is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium. See also A05787.

For more on John Booth click here

For a selection of images depicting servicemen of the Inner West click here

For further information on memorials and WW1 service men and honour boards please email: history@innerwest.nsw.gov.au

Images courtesy of Inner West Library and History

Heritage Festival 2019: Connecting People Places and the Past

It’s autumn which means it’s time for the 2019 Heritage Festival, presented by the Inner West Council Library and History under the auspices of National Trust.

Join us as we explore the rich history of the inner west and highlight the people who have shaped our vibrant neighbourhood. The Festival takes place from 18 April to 19 May

This year’s theme is Connecting People, Places and the Past. The events take place at a variety of historical inner west venues, some rarely open to the public.

Browse here and book for your events.

Historic Letterheads Uncovered

Before electronic communications, paper letters reigned supreme. Now perceived as ‘just that space where the company’s address is written’, letterheads were once so much more – an influential device businesses used in convincing people they were the best.

Letter from H.T. Seymour Ltd to Town Clerk Municipality of Marrickville, 22 April 1922

As one of the earliest examples of direct marketing, letterheads offered a quick outline about a business. But – like the company logo that sits silently in the footer of today’s emails – letterheads are more than mere adornments; they offer revealing insights into the history of the visual and commercial arts in Australia.

Australia’s growing population and an expanding economy fuelled a thriving art scene, with creative industry embracing marketing strategies to gain an advantage over competitors.

Billy Murdoch: A Star Cricketer from Balmain

Billy and his older brother Gilbert grew up in Balmain attending Balmain Public School and Fort Street School. At the age of 19 Billy was the first captain of the Balmain Rugby Club, when it entered the Sydney competition in 1874. But cricket was Billy’s first love and he became captain of NSW by 1879 and of Australia in 1880. Gilbert was a member of the Balmain Council for 10 years and its mayor for two.

Billy Murdoch was a colossus of Australian cricket in the 1880s, famous for scoring big hundreds. He scored 321 for NSW in 1882 and the first double century in Test cricket.

April 18th 2019

Balmain Town Hall Meeting Room

6:30pm – 8:00pm

Register