The Balmain Polka respectfully dedicated to the ladies of Balmain

Check out the the writings by Historian Lisa Murry on The Balmain Polka by Ernesto Spagnoletti on dictionaryofsydney.org

Cover of ‘The Balmain Polka’ by Ernesto Spagnoletti 1857 SLNSW

 

The Witches’ Houses of Annandale – AURA Journal 2

When: Tuesday, 4, December, 2018

Time: 6:00pm -8:00pm

Where:

Leichhardt Library
Piazza Level -Italian Forum, 23 Norton St
Leichhardt NSW

More about this event:

The Witches’ Houses of Annandale
Journal Number 2
Annandale Urban Research Association launch
Local authors will showcase images of the majestic houses that stand on Johnston Street, Annandale, between Rose Street and Kentville Avenue.
Hear some of the extraordinary women associated with the houses including:
• Bertha Blackmann from “Oybin”
• Elizabeth Young with “Claremont”
• Sister Dorothea with “St Basil’s Home”
• Betty Mason (The Annandale Association) that saved the block from further demolitions – and
• Sir Henry Parkes, who was living at Kenilworth at the time of his death

Cycling Communities: Cycling clubs in Sydney, 1860s-2000s’

HOSTED BY THE MARRICKVILLE HERITAGE SOCIETY

Cycling Communities: Cycling clubs in Sydney, 1860s-2000s’

Date: Sat 24 Nov at the Herb Greedy Hall, Petersham Road.

Time: 10:30am -12:00pm

Speaker: Dr Marc Rerceretnam, Cyclo-historian
The formation and popularity of bicycle clubs in Australia closely reflects the costs of purchasing a bicycle. In the 1860s it was largely a pastime for the rich and affluent, and by the 1890s it widened to include the middle classes. However by the turn of the twentieth century, with the rich and middle classes smitten with new motorized transportation like automobiles and motorcycles, opportunities to own a bicycle opened up for the first time to the working classes. As a result bicycle clubs flourished throughout the Australian social landscape. The decades following the Second World War saw growth in wealth and the growing affordability of personal motorized transportation. By the 1960s and especially in the 1970s, bicycle users turned away from the low tech bicycle towards the now affordable automobile. However by the 1990s and 2000s the bicycle acquired new meanings, practicalities and charm of bicycles were discovered yet again by new affluent professional classes.

 

Waratah Rovers Club 1 – Frank Walker glass slide collection, RAHS

Italian Fishing Fleet and the Apia Club Signage

From coughing to coffins: digging into council archives

To celebrate History Week 2018, Inner West Council hosted a fascinating presentation by well-known local historian Chrys Meader, about the worldwide pandemic of the pneumonic influenza in 1919 and how the local community dealt with the crisis.

The pneumonic influenza was one of the worst catastrophes of the 20th century. Widely known as the “Spanish flu” in 1919 its deadly reach eventually crept through the doors of Sydney homes.

This engaging presentation brought to life the social impact of the pandemic on the community. Travel outside of Sydney was restricted, church services were cancelled and theatres were closed.

The wearing of masks in public was compulsory. The Council responded by setting up inhalation chambers and the community was actively involved in managing the outbreak.

Attendees were shown rarely seen original correspondence and records from the former Marrickville Council archives, photographs, newspaper clippings and contemporary accounts of people who lived through the deadly, terrifying days of the pandemic.

Marrickville Council Infectious Diseases Register [photo courtesy Dr Peter Hobbins]

Marrickville Council Infectious Diseases Register [photo courtesy Dr Peter Hobbins]

Dr Peter Hobbins, a medical historian at the University of Sydney, said “it was really impressive to see how such a diverse range of records were brought to life, telling us not only about the disease, but how it affected the entire Inner West community a century ago”.

The effects of the Pneumonic plague in the Marrickville area.

Balmain Association Spring Garden Walks 2018

THIS SATURDAY 10.00am to 4.00pm

 This Saturday seven private gardens in Balmain East and Birchgrove will be open for inspection.

This is your opportunity to see behind the garden fence and enjoy a variety of beautiful private gardens – a large waterfront garden, a treasure of orchids and ferns, a secret garden with South American varieties of plants, a large formal garden, a large shady palm garden and a small terrace garden complete with bees.
Each garden is entirely different and provides a wealth of ideas to take back to your own.

The gardens will be open from 10.00am to 4.00pm with last entry at 3.00pm.

For more information please contact Di Garder

Tickets available at the Watch House 179 Darling St Balmain
and at Wyoming, 25 Wharf Rd Birchgrove
on the day
9:30am to 2:00pm

$15 for adults and children free. Please pay by cash

Balmain Watch House, 179 Darling St Balmain

History Talk: Callan Park Hospital for the Insane

To celebrate the 140th anniversary of the founding of the Callan Park Lunatic Asylum, Sarah Luke has published Callan Park, Hospital for the Insane (Australian Scholarly Publishing).

Sarah’s book explores the early history of the old Callan Park Lunatic Asylum, using Victorian-era medical files to explore the lives of its patients and staff. Discover the workings of the madhouse ­– from the tiny mansion originally used to house Sydney’s insane – to the magnum opus asylum that was the Kirkbride Complex.

Sarah will present a lecture at Leichhardt Library on Tuesday November 6th 6pm for 6:30pm start exploring the lives of the first patients of Callan Park.

Book here

Louisa Lawson’s Old Stone House

Louisa Lawson’s Old Stone House

Recently, I’ve focused on the big corporations like General Motors-Holden who set up along Carrington Road Marrickville, but what about individuals in the area? Louisa Lawson was one important local: a publisher, journalist, inventor, women’s activist and also Henry Lawson’s mother. She lived in this cottage from around 1893 to 1919 near the frequently flooded eastern end of Renwick Street and Richardsons Cresent. The cottage was close to the Gumbramorra Creek (now a stormwater canal lined during the Depression).

Louisa Lawson set up her printing press here and according to a 1931 article by George R Reeve (a history writer who lived in nearby Newtown), published two of her own books of verse and one of Henry’s from the cottage. The cottage was originally a lodge on Thomas Holt’s estate, The Warren. It was described as small, but Louisa Lawson was eager to greet visitors and entertain with stories of publishing The Dawn. Her eldest son, Henry Lawson also knew her cottage well enough to describe it while he was in Darlinghurst gaol in 1909. He needed bail and hoped Louisa would help:

The case seems desperate but do all you possibly can. I’d soon go hopelessly out of my mind here. Do anything to raise the money and I’ll take care this business will never happen again. You might even go to my mother. She has plenty. Her address is Mrs. Lawson, ‘Old Stone House’ Tempe (near Railway Station) . . . Her property is near the railway gates. She’d tell you of some friends anyway. It is real gaol this time, you know, and the loneliness is terrible . . . Yours in Trouble, Henry Lawson (Henry Lawson Letters, 1890–1922, Angus and Robertson, Sydney, 1970, p 175).

In addition to women’s right to vote, Louisa Lawson was active in addressing the working conditions of women and girls in factories. I wonder what she would have thought of her own cottage being demolished to make way for the area’s factories sometime after 1943?

Thanks Sue Castrique, another local writer and historian, for providing much of the above research into Louisa Lawson’s life in Marrickville.

 

History Week 2018: Broughton Hall: Brought to life

Image:Henry King, courtesy Mark Turnbull and Keep Family Collection

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History Week 2018: Broughton Hall: Brought to life
When:

Saturday, 1, September, 2018
What time:

10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Where:

Broughton Hall
Church Street
Lilyfield NSW
More about this event:

Outdoor exhibition

A self-guided, outdoor historic exhibition that explores the cycles of life at this colonial mansion and its gardens. Discover how it became a military hospital in WW1 and its subsequent regeneration as the first voluntary psychiatric hospital.

Today Broughton Hall is a place of contemporary therapeutic care.

Enter at Church Street, Lilyfield, between Wharf Road and Glover Street

 

TypeCast – Typographic exhibition by Avril Makula

If you love the character of type fonts throughout the Inner West this exhibition is not to be missed.
Augustt 22 – September 2 at the Chrissie Cotter Gallery.