History Week 2018: Broughton Hall: Brought to life

Image:Henry King, courtesy Mark Turnbull and Keep Family Collection

Advanced search History Week 2018: Broughton Hall: Brought to life When:

Saturday, 1, September, 2018 What time:

10:00 AM to 4:00 PM Where:

Broughton Hall Church Street Lilyfield NSW More about this event:

Outdoor exhibition

A self-guided, outdoor historic exhibition that explores the cycles of life at this colonial mansion and its gardens. Discover how it became a military hospital in WW1 and its subsequent regeneration as the first voluntary psychiatric hospital.

Today Broughton Hall is a place of contemporary therapeutic care.

Enter at Church Street, Lilyfield, between Wharf Road and Glover Street

 

TypeCast – Typographic exhibition by Avril Makula

If you love the character of type fonts throughout the Inner West this exhibition is not to be missed. Augustt 22 – September 2 at the Chrissie Cotter Gallery.

Our History – Your Say -Survey

We would love to have your input for some important decisions to be made about the future of our Community History and Archive services.

We invite you to have your say about location options for the History Collections and our future strategy to guide planning for our services over the next ten years. Click Here August 1 -29

P H Bussell 1895, 127 Trafalgar Street, Annandale

Rega Products: Let us spray!

Rega Products: Let us spray! While memories of the Depression lingered, factories on Marrickville’s Carrington Road roared back to life. “The activity visible on all sides of this plant of General Motors – Holden is one the finest proof of the definite return of prosperity to the country as a whole,” according to The Land on 1 May 1936.

So what was this activity? We’ve already introduced AH Peters and Duly & Hansford, but Rega Products’ new factory was also going up on the other side of Carrington Road.

Designed by modernist architect Aaron M Bolot, the factory was praised for its design and connection to consumers. It was said that people would feel “good and reliable products must come forth from efficient and beautiful buildings.” I’m sure this remains true for the factory’s current occupants, New Directions.

So what did Rega Products make? It provided “men on the land with sprayers for the cattle and their fruit trees, for the manufacture they provide spray pistons for duco-ing or painting their goods; for the house-wife sprays for suppressing moths and vermin; and for the motorists the pumps for their cars” according to the Building (24 July 1937). One of these clients was General Motors-Holden, ordering a massive 30,000 pumps from Rega Products!

Pumping and spraying chemicals was soon to be even more important but we’ll cover that another time. And that so-catchy “let us spray” tag line? It came from a 1932 ad for Rega Products merchandise.

General Motors-Holden Assembly Plant Restarts 1934

General Motors-Holden Assembly Plant Restarts 1934

The General Motors Australia assembly plant on Carrington Road Marrickville shut during the Great Depression. One of its main suppliers was also struggling. That company was Holden Body Builders in South Australia.

But General Motors spotted an opportunity to secure its future in Australia. Acting quickly for fear rival Ford might act first, General Motors snatched up Holden for £1.1 million. At about $100 million in today’s terms, this seems pretty cheap now!

General Motors-Holden’s Limited (GM-H) started on 1 March 1931. GM-H made a further loss of £341,914 in 1931-32, but according to a 1935 GM-H report money from wool sales in 1933-34 improved spending, including on cars which were now a necessity in Australia. This brought the Marrickville assembly plant on Carrington Road back to life. It opened again on 3 April 1934, marked by a visit by Lieutenant Colonel Bruner, the NSW Minister for Transport.

This 1936 photo of the Marrickville plant shows cars of the 1930s to be more streamlined and enclosed. The signage says “General Motors Holden’s Limited” with the distinctive GMH on the pediment above. And a row of newly planted Canary Island Date Palms lines the road. If you’re out for a drive along Carrington Road today, come and see how they’ve grown!